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Fredric March: The Eyes Have It

by Bobby Rivers

“Some of you seem to think this is a course in anatomy.”  ~Fredric March in The Wild Party as the anthropology professor in a women’s university.

In that 1929 talkie directed by Dorothy Arzner, he also teaches feminism to his flirtiest student, Stella, played by Clara Bow.  The professor literally saves that babe in the woods from possible rape after she hit a roadhouse for some hot cha cha.  He educates her on the college’s founder: “She braved the ridicule of her friends and the abuse of her contemporaries to bring a true freedom to women.”  Prof. Gilmore falls for Stella but she must embrace “work, scholarship and achievement” and stop being a party girl. This movie made Fredric March a star. We can see why. The camera loved his face. Early March had matinee idol looks and serious actor skills.  His tone here — in vocal quality and performance — still feel modern.  Certainly more modern than Bow’s.  Her Betty Boop faces were more suited for a silent film.  She does too much. March seems to have hit Hollywood cameras with a natural sense that less would be more in the new sound era.  He stars in another film directed by Dorothy Arzner, Sarah and Son.  With this 1930 film, Arzner became the first woman to direct another woman to a Best Actress Academy Award nomination.  Oscar nominee Ruth Chatterton (much better and memorable as the restless wife of Dodsworth) played the German Sarah.  Bow’s physical excess is matched by Chatterton’s vocal excess. Her accent sounds a little to the left of Lili Von Shtupp in Blazing Saddles (“I vant you should get up und get out und get some money.  Or you don’t see me again…mebbe.”)  She’s the hoofer/singer who married a lazy American.  He gives their baby away and then dies.  March stars as the respectful lawyer who helps the hard-working single mother reclaim her son.  Again, he’s natural.  Every time Chatterton opens her mouth, lederhosen pops out.

The Eagle and the Hawk.  I wish this World War I film was as popular as 1930′s All Quiet On The Western Front.  The star quality felt about March in his first Arzner film has been confirmed by the time he stars in this 1933 drama.  And he’d been recognized by Hollywood with the first of his two Best Actor Oscars, winning for 1931-32′s Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.  His second Oscar® came for William Wyler’s 1946 classic about World War II veterans, The Best Years of Our Lives. Only about 70 minutes long, The Eagle and the Hawk packs quite a punch and contains one of my favorite March performances.  The movie is visually handsome, with the 1930s pearly Paramount sheen plus a gorgeous use of darkness and shadow in its black and white cinematography.  The aerial sequences are exciting.  March and jovial Jack Oakie were both in The Wild Party but didn’t have scenes together.  They do in this WWI picture.  They’re best friends. Cary Grant plays the bad-ass.  “This is a war.  I’m hired to kill the enemy,” Grant’s airman says.  We see each pilot’s character in the opening credits.  Jerry (March) is the upper class good sportsman.  Mike (Oakie) is the happy-go-lucky slug. Crocker (Grant) is the unsympathetic roughneck.  Here, March is in peak form.  His internal work is masterful.  He mentally breaks down from a likable guy who sees war as sport to a haunted shell of a war-hating hero by the end. He drinks, as several March characters do. We feel the rage building in Jerry’s soul.  He’s at war with himself every time he gets more medals for shooting down the enemy.  “I got these for killing kids!”  It’s all there in March’s eyes.  And in his stillness. He was one of those actors who realized early on that to be still, to let the audience come to and into your character was very powerful.

A commanding officer asks Jerry to give the new fresh-faced recruits a pep talk with tales of his latest victory. We see the self-loathing and irony in his eyes as he tells them  “…you’re fighting for humanity and for the preservation of civilization.”  In March’s most stirring scene, Jerry has a nightmare about combat.  He’s dreaming but his eyes are open.  For that’s what war has made his life — a nightmare with his eyes open. A much-needed breather from the horrors of war is supplied by Carole Lombard as The Beautiful Lady at a London party.  Her serious role as an elegant woman who comforts Jerry for a night on leave is practically a cameo.  Four years later, March and Lombard co-star for lively loopiness in the screwball comedy, Nothing Sacred.

My first professional broadcast job was doing news on 93 QFM, a radio station in Milwaukee.  During that gig, I got to meet and spend time with Rosemary Clooney, Margaret Whiting and Martha Raye when they toured in a 1970s stage revue that played Milwaukee for a week.  One night after the show, we went out to a barbecue rib joint for dinner and they started telling show biz stories.  Martha, who was under contract to Paramount in the 1930s, piped up with what a flirt Fredric March was.  Not only that, but he was endowed with more than just a great acting talent.  Rosemary and Margaret practically did the Danny Thomas Spit Take with their beverages.  I said “Fredric March?”  She said, “Why do you think he wore that cape in Death Takes A Holiday?  He needed something long enough to cover it up.”  What a marvelous night that was with Martha Raye, who later added “Lombard knew how to handle him.”  Rosemary Clooney and Margaret Whiting were tired and wanted to go back to the hotel after we finished dinner.  Martha turned to me and said, “Let’s get a nightcap.”  Over vodka tonics in downtown Milwaukee, I asked her if the celebrated actor was really that much of a Casanova.  Martha Raye’s answer:  “Honey, if he saw a crack in the wall, he’d make a pass at it.”  I miss Old Hollywood.  Fredric March.  He was gifted.

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Bobby Rivers is a veteran network TV host & entertainment reporter. He had his own VH1 celebrity talk show, reviewed movies for ABC News/Lifetime TV & Premiere Radio and hosted “Metro Movies with Bobby Rivers,” a weekly local show highlighting the NYC film scene. He’s acted in TV commercials and played clueless “Prof. Haige” in satirical news features for The Onion.

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Jill Blake

Jill Blake is the owner of the classic film website Sittin’ on a Backyard Fence. She is also a co-founder and editor of the film site The Black Maria and film editor at CC2K. In 2012, she was interviewed on-air by Turner Classic Movies host Ben Mankiewicz. In 2013, she was a featured guest on the TCM podcast. In her spare time Jill is a stay-at-home mom, wife, fried okra connoisseur, and the neighborhood’s own L.B. Jeffries.

Comments

whistlingypsy
Reply

Bobby, a wonderful contribution to the March-in-March blogathon: both a critical assessment of Fredric March as an actor and some personal memories of the man. I’m a wee bit jealous that you shared an evening chatting with Rosemary Clooney, Margaret Whiting AND Martha Raye (I wonder what else was said that you didn’t share). Your assessment of March as committed to developing his entire range of skills is insightful; he acted with his eyes, his voice and his calm stillness. I would say, just as a minor quibble, that poor Clara Bow was painfully aware of her shortcomings when she appeared in her first sound film. The prospect of the microphone filled her with an enormous amount of anxiety, which overshadowed the entire experience. I think she was greatly relieved when the whole business was over.

kimalysong
Reply

Oh your post got me interested in seeing March in some early talkies (and seeing Clara Bow in a talkie, so far I’ve only seen her silents),

I think the earliest March film I saw was Jekyll and Hyde but I loved reading about his earlier films. Thanks for your interesting post and for sharing that little story with us.

I am also glad to see another Eagle & the Hawk fan. It really should be better known.

Cliff Aliperti
Reply

Excellent work, Bobby! You know, way back when I first met you through Twitter it was in comments over Fredric March and at that time you DM’ed me about the Martha Raye story. And so when I saw you were contributing to March-in-March I crossed my fingers that you’d share it here, so glad you did!

Georgia
Reply

Jill, conratulations for the wonderful effort. I’ve been a very recent fan of Fredric March (just six months!) and I’m trying to watch as many of his films that are available. I enjoyed all the articles so far but Mr. River’s last paragraph had me in stitches (although anyone who’s watched “Anthony Adverse” must have sort of figured it out – talking about shamelessly tight pants!).

kittenbiscuits
Reply

Thank you for coming here and reading the contributions!

Bobby has some great stories to tell!

And yes, March’s “assets” are very much on display in Anthony Adverse.

kittenbiscuits
Reply

Bobby,

Thanks so much for your wonderful contribution to this event. I love reading about your experiences with stars like Martha Raye. Your unique perspective has added so much to this event.

Talk to me!

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